Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

Also Know As Hypergranular Promyelocytic Leukemia

Sign/Symptoms
Drugs
Treatments
Attributes
Commonality is rare
Further Tests

Efficacy of Alternative and Other Treatments According to GRADE* Ranking:

Vitamin A [1, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It may mildly help in preventing some of the symptoms, and even then has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present. Please note, this acts as a PREVENTATIVE treatment, and not necessarily symptomatic relief.

Recommendation: Weakly in favor (Promyelocytic Leukemia often responds positively to a combination of Vitamin A and chemo therapy. This must be done under the supervision of an oncologist. Taking non prescription supplements or increasing dietery intake without a doctors supervision will not necessarily improve outlook of leukemia.)

Grade of Evidence: Moderate quality of evidence

Vitae Elixxir[1, 21, 22]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It is proposed only as a weak supportive symptomatic support, and even then, has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present. Warning: Possible side effects of Vitae Elixxir include diarrhoea, pain, and a general worsening of existing symptoms.

Recommendation: No recommendation (Available evidence does not support claims that vitae elixir helps to treat leukemia)

Grade of Evidence: Very low quality of evidence

Rabdosia Rubescens (Dong Ling Cao, Oridonin, Isodon Rubescens) [1, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It may mildly help with some of the symptoms, and even then has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present.

Recommendation: Weakly in favor (Laboratory studies show that rabdosia rubescens has anti-cancer activity, and may be helpful in the treatment of leukemia. However, more studies are needed)

Grade of Evidence: Low quality of evidence

Pau D'Arco (Lapachol, Tabebuia Impetiginosa, Tabebuia Heptaphylla) [1, 14]:

Please note, this treatment has potentially serious side effects. Some of the chemicals in the plant are known to be toxic. High doses are known to cause liver and kidney. Even at low doses, chemicals in the plant may interfere with blood clotting, causing excess bleeding and anaemia. Pau D'Arco should be avoided, especially by pregnant or breastfeeding women.

Recommendation: Strongly against (There is insufficient evidence to support claims that Pau D'arco helps to treat leukemia. This, combined with its potentially harmful side effects if taken without supervision from a doctor or pharmacist gives enough reason to avoid this treatment.)

Grade of Evidence: Very low quality of evidence

Mistletoe (Iscador, Viscum Album) [1, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It may mildly help with some of the symptoms, and even then has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present. WARNING: The mistletoe plant should NOT be eaten because it is poisonous. May cause seizures, coma and death. It should only be taken as a purified mistletoe extract, and only in recommended doses.

Recommendation: No recommendation (Studies on the effect of Mistletoe on Leukemia have yielded mixed, conflicting results. More research is needed.)

Grade of Evidence: Low quality of evidence

Licorice (Glcyrhiz Gaba) [1, 5, 6, 7, 8]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It may mildly help with some of the symptoms, and even then has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present. Licorice has been shown to have potentially harmful side effects in people with high blood pressure, liver or kidney diseases)

Recommendation: Weakly in favor (Small studies and laboratory tests show that Licorice may help reduce tumor growth in leukemia, but more research is needed)

Grade of Evidence: Low quality of evidence

Germanium (Germanium Sesquioxide, Vitamin O) [1, 2, 3, 4]:

WARNING: Germanium may cause permanent Kidney failure. Even organic supplements, though less toxic than inorganic supplements, have caused kidney and liver damage. NOT TO BE USED.

Recommendation: Strongly against (Evidence shows that Germanium is not effective in treating Leukemia in any way, and is also toxic, causing severe kidney and liver damage.)

Grade of Evidence: Moderate quality of evidence

Vitamin C [30, 31, 32, 33]:

Recommendation: Weakly in favor (Early studies show vitamin C may be able to help treat acute promyelocyctic leukemia. More studies are needed)

Grade of Evidence: Low quality of evidence

* www.gradeworkinggroup.org

 

Summary References

Treatments:

1. Ades T, Alteri R, Gansler T, Yeargin P, "Complete Guide to Complimentary & Alternative Cancer Therapies", American Cancer Society, Atlanta USA, 2009

2. Baselt, R. (2008). Disposition of Toxic Drugs and Chemicals in Man (8 ed.). Foster City, CA: Biomedical Publications. pp. 693–694.

3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9237323

4. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/germanium

5. Winston, David; Steven Maimes (2007). Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief. Healing Arts Press.

6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15190039

7. http://nccam.nih.gov/health/licoriceroot/

8. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-licorice.html

9. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/mistletoe

10. http://nccam.nih.gov/health/mistletoe/ataglance.htm

11. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002883.htm

12. http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/m/mistle40.html

13. http://www.bmj.com/content/333/7582/1293.full?ijkey=56e55886cc53e0c478801e74001edc3bea1c322e&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

14. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/pau-d-arco   

15. http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com/nd/Search.aspx?fs=ND&pt=100&id=1140&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

16. http://mct.aacrjournals.org/content/4/4/578.abstract

17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15586232

18. http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-1140-RABDOSIA RUBESCENS.aspx?activeIngredientId=1140&activeIngredientName=RABDOSIA RUBESCENS

19. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/rabdosia-rubescens

20. http://alternativehealing.org/dong_ling_cao.htm

21. http://www.annieappleseedproject.org/vitaeelixxir.html

22. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/vitae-elixxir

23. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-vitamina.html

24. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/vitamina.html

25. http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamina.asp

26. http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/vad/en/

27. Latham, Michael E. (1997). Human Nutrition in the Developing World (Fao Food and Nutrition Paper). Food & Agriculture Organization of the United. ISBN 92-5-103818-X.

28. Sommer, Alfred (1995). Vitamin a Deficiency and Its Consequences: A Field Guide to Detection and Control. Geneva: World Health Organization. ISBN 92-4-154478-3.

29. http://www.unicef.org/worldfitforchildren/files/A-RES-S27-2E.pdf

30. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3798917/

31. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0054448/

32. http://jeffreydachmd.com/vitamin-c-saves-dying-man/

33. http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/vitamin-c-pdq




 


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