Acute Coronary Syndromes

Sign/Symptoms
Drugs
Treatments
Attributes
Commonality is uncommon
Incidence is approximately 1 in 167 people
Further Tests

Efficacy of Alternative and Other Treatments According to GRADE* Ranking:

Strychnos Nux-Vomica (Maqianzi, Poison Nut) [1, 27, 28, 29]:

WARNING! This substance is HIGHLY POISONOUS. The seeds contain Strychnine, which may cause convulsions, breathing difficulties and death, even if as little as 5 milligrams is ingested

Recommendation: Strongly against (There is no evidence in the form of clinical trials which reports the effectiveness of Strychnos Nux-Vomica, because it is highly poisonous to humans, and is not recommended.)

Grade of Evidence: very low quality of evidence

Selenium Supplement [1, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It may mildly help with some of the symptoms, and even then has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present. IMPORTANT: Selenium is toxic in high doses. Massive overdoses can cause kidney failure, breathing difficulty and death. Selenium should only be taken at healthy levels which the body is able to tolerate.

Recommendation:  No recommendation (Available evidene does not support claims that selenium helps to prevent or treat acute coronary syndrome)

Grade of Evidence: very low of evidence

Pine Bark Extract [1, 15, 16, 17]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It may mildly help with some of the symptoms, and even then has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present.

Recommendation: weakly in favor  (Early studies indicate potential for Pine bark extract in the treatment of coronary disease, but more clinical studies need to be done)

Grade of Evidence: low quality of evidence

Phytochemicals (Antioxidants) [1, 12, 13, 14]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It may mildly help with some of the symptoms, and even then has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present.

Recommendation: no recommendation (There is insufficient evidence to support claims that phytochemical supplements can prevent or treat coronary disease. More studies are needed. A balanced diet with fruit, vegetables, and grain is recommended to prevent illness until further research into supplements is done.)

Grade of Evidence: low quality of evidence

Pau D'Arco (Lapachol, Tabebuia Impetiginosa, Tabebuia Heptaphylla) [1, 11]:

Please note, this treatment has potentially serious side effects. Some of the chemicals in the plant are known to be toxic. High doses are known to cause liver and kidney. Even at low doses, chemicals in the plant may interfere with blood clotting, causing excess bleeding and anaemia. Pau D'Arco should be avoided, especially by pregnant or breastfeeding women.

Recommendation: Strongly against (There is insufficient evidence to support claims that Pau D'arco helps to treat acute coronary syndrome. This, combined with its potentially harmful side effects if taken without supervision from a doctor or pharmacist gives enough reason to avoid this treatment.)

Grade of Evidence: very low quality of evidence

Megavitamin Therapy (Multivitamin, Vitamin Supplements) [1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]:

Please Note that while supplements are effective in correcting deficiencies in the body, their long-term usage is not helpful in preventing diseases like cancer and heart disease. To prevent these illnesses one should eat the natural foods which these vitamins and minerals come from. Replacing natural sources with artificial supplements actually increases the risk of heart disease, cancer, and other diseases. Supplements should be taken only as a balanced multivitamin supplement that contains no more than 100% of the recommended daily allowance. It would be most helpful in people with restricted food intakes, pregnant women and women of childbearing age.

Recommendation: Weakly against. (There is no evidence that Megavitamin therapy can prevent or treat coronary heart disease. In fact, long term therapy can lead to increased risk)

Grade of Evidence: moderate quality of evidence

Copper [1, 3, 4]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It may mildly help with some of the symptoms, and even then has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present.

Recommendation: no recommendation  (There is insufficient evidence to support claims that copper helps to treat acute coronary syndrome in any way)

Grade of Evidence: very low quality of evidence

Cats Claw (Uncaria Tomentosa) [1, 2]:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It is proposed only as a weak supportive symptomatic support, and even then, has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present.

Recommendation: no recomendation (insufficient evidence to support claims that Cats Claw can help to treat acute coronary syndrome)

Grade of Evidence: very low quality of evidence

Red Pepper (Capsaicin):

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It is proposed only as a weak supportive symptomatic support, and even then, has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present.

Recommendation: no recommendation (Available evidence does not support claims that Red Peppers help to treat or prevent acute coronary syndrome in any way)

Grade of Evidence: low quality of evidence

Neural Therapy:

Please note, this management does NOT treat the condition itself. It is proposed only as a weak supportive symptomatic support, and even then, has insufficient evidence to back up this claim at present.

Recommendation: no recommendation (there is insufficient evidence to show that Neural Therapy can help treat Heart Disease in any way)

Grade of Evidence: very low quality of evidence

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT):

Recommendation: strongly against (research is being done on whether or not HBOT helps to treat coronary heart disease, but as of yet, no evidence supports this claim)

Grade of Evidence: very low quality of evidence

Chiropractic:

Recommendation: no recommendation (there is insufficient evidence to show that chiropractic can help treat Heart Disease in any way)

Grade of Evidence: very low quality of evidence

* www.gradeworkinggroup.org

 

Summary References

Treatments:

1. Ades T, Alteri R, Gansler T, Yeargin P, "Complete Guide to Complimentary & Alternative Cancer Therapies", American Cancer Society, Atlanta USA, 2009

2. http://www.nutrasanus.com/cats-claw.html

3. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/copper

4. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002419.htm

5.  http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/orthomolecular-medicine

6. http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/163/2/192.pdf

7. http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/ortho.html

8. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/72/5/707

9. http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/no-index/about-ama/13638.shtml

10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17327526

11. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/pau-d-arco

12. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/phytochemicals

13. http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/LabelClaims/QualifiedHealthClaims/ucm073992.htm

14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20216418

15. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00214032

16. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/pine-bark-extract

17. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-pycnogenol.html

18. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/selenium?sitearea=ETO

19. http://www.cancer.gov/Templates/doc.aspx?viewid=ED8AD8E8-6AE5-458D-8091-393F4CB73F0D

20. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-selenium.html

21. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9290116

22. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9829869

23. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10335455

24. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2136228

25. http://www.springerlink.com/content/v0r644v4ju5153k2/

26. http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/101/5/283

27. David Michael Wood et al. Case report: Survival after deliberate strychnine self-poisoning, with toxicokinetic data. Critical Care October 2002 Vol 6 No 5

28. Arnold, M.D., Harry L. (1968). Poisonous Plants of Hawaii. Tokyo, Japan: Charles E. Tuttle Co.. p. 20. ISBN 0804804745.

29. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/strychnos-nux-vomica










 

 


Public Discussion

No discussions exist for this condition yet. You can be the first to create one!
GT:0.377